THE CULTURAL MARKERS OF SOUTHERN CULTURE

As opposed to the cornerstones we discussed in “The Cornerstones of Southern Culture Article”, this article will discuss the smaller aspects of our culture that make us so distinct from surrounding cultures. Many of these are under attack and their attacks will be discussed later in greater depth. For now I will just outline a few large aspects of our culture, leaving out the little aspects of our mindset and culture.

Cuisine-
Ah, Southern home cooking. Nothing like it. Catfish, gritz, barbecue, fried chicken, etc., all remind us of home. Of course, this particular side of our culture has not been attacked as much but it will be, make no mistake about it. Everything Southern will be wiped clean from the face of the earth if the globalists and Yankees have their way. I imagine the influx of Yankees and Mexicans will have something to do with it as they no doubt have less respect for our unique and amazing food than we do. Be ready for when this attack comes or be prepared to fight back however you can if you do encounter it.

Architecture-
This isn’t typically something you think of when you picture a culture but our architecture certainly is a part of our culture and it has been attacked more than our food has been. We forget that plenty of antebellim manors still stand today. Many can be visited as well but the ever-so angry Blacks love to whine about the slavery whenever they can and so they call for the boycott of these tours. This is simply an attack on our culture. In Europe, we see atrocious “modern” monstrocities raised right in the midst of traditional and ever so beautiful European styled houses, often looking like an alien spaceship. While I don’t know for sure, I’m sure plenty of this has gone on in our small towns and traditionally Southern cultural hubs like Charleston. What Southron would not want an Antebellum styled house? What Southron would not want a porch (preferrably a front one)? It’s in our nature to be drawn to this style of architecture. Perhaps because it’s romanticised or maybe because it’s simply appealing to us. Whatever the case, we are drawn to our Antebellum houses, front porches, and farm houses. Architects will surely, over time, start to be infiltrated by Non-Southerners who will change the architecture completely from Southern style to Yankee style. I confess, I have no idea where to start fighting or reversing this but I know that realizing it is happening is the first step.

Dances-
This feature of our culture has largely died out for the majority of us though we all recognize it when we see it. From the various casual dances to the fast Appalachian clogging jigs, our dances reflect the attitude and character of our ancestors and of our culture as well. Yankees call us slow to move but if you’ve ever seen clogging then you would know that is horribly untrue. It’s a shame that our parents and schools no longer teach their children these energetic and entertaining dances, no doubt just another part of the globalist plan. Teach your kids these dances however you can, take them to dance classes, for example. Or better yet, learn them yourself and teacg your kids. Don’t let these beautiful dances die. Savor and pass them on.

Music-
As Southerners we hold our music very close and dear to our heart. I’m not talking about the degenerate filth that Nashville and California pumps out, I am talking about our folk songs, the songs we all know to some degree. The songs our ancestors wrote and sang ring through our souls. Think about Dixieland for example; every true Southron knows it, even if not word for word. We used to sing those kinds of songs at football games and our Scots-Irish and English ancestors sang them on the porch or during battles when fighting for our independance. We must not forget this, it is not unimportant. Every little part of our culture must be preserved from our Christianity down to the way we walk (not that we walk differently). Sing, play, and listen to these songs frequently and do it while being care-free. Our culture is not something to be ashamed of and we must learn that.

Speech-
One of the largest aspects of a culture that exists in a state where it is not dominant is the language. Our accent originally developed from the English twang that our ancestors brought. We slowly developed what we have today. I’m not a linguist so I won’t try to explain the technicalities of what our accent consists of but any true Southerner knows. If you are interested in the linguistic and technical side of it, watch . Our lanthis video guage and accent is the key way we take notice of eachother, making a key factor to our identity. If we can’t identify who is Southern and dedicated to our cause then we will not be able to cope as well. It is an extremely useful tool that we should not forget about. If your accent isn’t as Southern as it could be, work to fix it, little by little. Pronounce certain letters and sounds as your brethren do and use the words they use. Don’t be afraid of the criticism and don’t change your accent to seem presentable to Yankee emplohers like many Western Carolinians do when going to Eastern Carolina. The Yankees hate our accent and seek to change it so that we lose our identity. Don’t let them. Fight back and be proud of it, flaunt it around even.

Hospitality-
An often forgotten part of our culture that even I admittedly forgot while writing this article. We are known for our Southern hospitality inside and outside of America. Nowadays, young Southern men have forgotten to do this almost entirely, becoming no more polite than your average Yankee. This, I believe, has happened for three main reasons. First and foremost, our fathers are not teaching their children to know this like the palm of their hand, they are doing what my father did, which is simply doing it themselves and hoping their children follow their example. They will not, it must be installed vigoursly. But, of course, this is not the only reason as many fathers still do teach their children how to be polite. The second reason is the rise of diversity. Diversity is not our strength and it makes us despise the the society we live in whether we realize it or not. All humans wish to be with their own and when you see that you are outnumbered or not the majority in the town that has been historically Southern, your natural response is to stop being polite to the invaders. This is unfortunate to say the least but it is still true. The third and last reason is the attack on masculinity and the feminist idea that women do not need men. I remember when I was younger, some friends and I had gone out for dinner. As we reached our table, the boyfriend of one of the girls pulled out a chair for his girlfriend. She proceeded to snap, “I can do it myself!” This ridiculousness causes young men to feel that their help is unwanted and despised, prompting to be polite less frequently. What would our ancestors think of this I wonder. I can only imagine this same scenario happens with various other couples at dinner, at doorways, wherever. This is isn’t a problem with the men, it is the woman’s issue that must be dealt with. Women should learn to respect the hospitality of their partners or even from strangers. There’s no need to be rude about someine being nice. The only way to truely fix this is to vigoursly install hospitality and a respect for it in our young boys and girls. And don’t just install pulling out chairs and holding doors into them, install in them the tendency to call strangers “sir” and “ma’am” as well as the other common courtesies such as “thank you”.

Given the cornerstones and these small aspects (of which there’s many more), it’s amusing that anyone could ever tell a Southerner that they don’t have a culture. It’s silly, really. Our culture is being attacked and that kind of statement is just one example of an attack. They want to cut us off from our culture and our identity so that we become hopeless and lost, giving up and rolling over. We can not let that happen. We do have a culture and we must fight to protect it.

-By Southern Revivalist

Advertisements

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s